If you’re a teacher, chances are you’ve been assigned the task of grouping your students by level at some point. But what if there were other ways to group your readers? Here are 5 interesting alternatives to group your readers.

Group Your Readers
Group Your Readers

1. Group by Skill, Strategy, or Instructional Goal

Group Your Readers
Group Students by Skill

Grouping by skill or strategy is an interesting task. It allows students to be placed in groups based on their strengths. For example, if you have a group of students who are struggling with reading comprehension, you could put them all in the same group so they can work on that skill together. Or, if you have a group of students who are struggling with spelling, you could put them all in the same group so they can work on that skill together. By grouping students based on their skills and strategies, you can tailor your instruction to better meet their needs.

2. Group by Interest or Genre

If you have a class full of budding scientists, why not group them together and let them explore their interests? Or if you have a class full of literature lovers, why not group them together and let them discuss their favorite books? By grouping students based on their interests, you can create a more engaging and lively classroom environment.

Group Your Readers
Group Your Readers

3. Teacher-Selected Heterogeneous Groups

Teacher-selected heterogeneous groups are groups that are created by the teacher but are not based on any one particular criterion. For example, the teacher might choose to put the student who is struggling the most with reading in the same group as the student who is excelling the most in math. By doing this, the teacher can ensure that each group has a diverse range of ability levels and can provide targeted instruction accordingly.

4. Student-Selected Combinations

If you want to give your students some control over their own learning, then student-selected combinations might be right for you. With this type of grouping, students are allowed to choose which classmates they would like to work with. This can be done either by allowing students to choose freely or by assigning each student a role (e.g., “leader,” “researcher,” “recorder”) and having them choose classmates who will complement their role. Either way, this type of grouping gives students a say in their own learning and can lead to more engaged and productive groups.

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5. Grouping by Potluck/ Grouping in a Random Way

Potluck grouping is when students are grouped together randomly, like picking names out of a hat. This type of grouping can lead to some very dynamic groups because it allows for unexpected combinations of people. However, it is important to make sure that all groups are equally balanced in terms of ability levels so that no one feels left out or overwhelmed.

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There are many different ways to group your readers other than by level! By thinking outside the box and utilizing alternative methods such as grouping by skill or interest, you can create a more engaging and dynamic classroom environment that meets the needs of all your students. So next time you’re tasked with grouping your readers, consider trying something new!

You are interested in other reading small groups blog post, check it out here!!

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